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  • 1. Aims and Scope

    Gut and Liver is an international journal of gastroenterology, focusing on the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tree, pancreas, motility, and neurogastroenterology. Gut atnd Liver delivers up-to-date, authoritative papers on both clinical and research-based topics in gastroenterology. The Journal publishes original articles, case reports, brief communications, letters to the editor and invited review articles in the field of gastroenterology. The Journal is operated by internationally renowned editorial boards and designed to provide a global opportunity to promote academic developments in the field of gastroenterology and hepatology. +MORE

  • 2. Editorial Board

    Editor-in-Chief + MORE

    Editor-in-Chief
    Yong Chan Lee Professor of Medicine
    Director, Gastrointestinal Research Laboratory
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Univ. California San Francisco
    San Francisco, USA

    Deputy Editor

    Deputy Editor
    Jong Pil Im Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Robert S. Bresalier University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA
    Steven H. Itzkowitz Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY, USA
  • 3. Editorial Office
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  • 8. Peer Review

    All papers submitted to Gut and Liver are reviewed by the editorial team before being sent out for an external peer review to rule out papers that have low priority, insufficient originality, scientific flaws, or the absence of a message of importance to the readers of the Journal. A decision about these papers will usually be made within two or three weeks.
    The remaining articles are usually sent to two reviewers. It would be very helpful if you could suggest a selection of reviewers and include their contact details. We may not always use the reviewers you recommend, but suggesting reviewers will make our reviewer database much richer; in the end, everyone will benefit. We reserve the right to return manuscripts in which no reviewers are suggested.

    The final responsibility for the decision to accept or reject lies with the editors. In many cases, papers may be rejected despite favorable reviews because of editorial policy or a lack of space. The editor retains the right to determine publication priorities, the style of the paper, and to request, if necessary, that the material submitted be shortened for publication.

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Reappraisal of Antihypertensive Medicine Doxazosin and Carvedilol as a Potential Therapeutic for Hepatic Fibrosis

Yong-Han Paik*,

*Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence to: Yong-Han Paik, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06351, Korea, Tel: +82-2-3410-3878, Fax: +82-2-3410-6983, E-mail: yh.paik@skku.edu

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Gut Liver 2016;10(1):10-11. https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl15576

Published online January 15, 2016, Published date January 31, 2016

Copyright © Gut and Liver.

References

  1. Paik, YH, Kim, J, Aoyama, T, De Minicis, S, Bataller, R, Brenner, DA. Role of NADPH oxidases in liver fibrosis. Antioxid Redox Signal, 2014;20;2854-2872.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  2. Mehal, WZ, Schuppan, D. Antifibrotic therapies in the liver. Semin Liver Dis, 2015;35;184-198.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  3. Kim, MY, Cho, MY, Baik, SK, et al. Beneficial effects of candesartan, an angiotensin-blocking agent, on compensated alcoholic liver fibrosis: a randomized open-label controlled study. Liver Int, 2012;32;977-987.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  4. Mu?oz-Ortega, MH, Llamas-Ram?rez, RW, Romero-Delgadillo, NI, et al. Doxazosin treatment attenuates carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in hamsters through a decrease in transforming growth factor beta secretion. Gut Liver, 2016;10;101-108.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  5. Oben, JA, Roskams, T, Yang, S, et al. Hepatic fibrogenesis requires sympathetic neurotransmitters. Gut, 2004;53;438-445.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  6. Sancho-Bru, P, Bataller, R, Colmenero, J, et al. Norepinephrine induces calcium spikes and proinflammatory actions in human hepatic stellate cells. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol, 2006;291;G877-G884.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  7. Sigala, B, McKee, C, Soeda, J, et al. Sympathetic nervous system catecholamines and neuropeptide Y neurotransmitters are upregulated in human NAFLD and modulate the fibrogenic function of hepatic stellate cells. PLoS One, 2013;8;e72928.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  8. Sokol, SI, Cheng, A, Frishman, WH, Kaza, CS. Cardiovascular drug therapy in patients with hepatic diseases and patients with congestive heart failure. J Clin Pharmacol, 2000;40;11-30.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  9. Ba?ares, R, Moitinho, E, Matilla, A, et al. Randomized comparison of long-term carvedilol and propranolol administration in the treatment of portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Hepatology, 2002;36;1367-1373.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  10. Mandorfer, M, Bota, S, Schwabl, P, et al. Nonselective beta blockers increase risk for hepatorenal syndrome and death in patients with cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Gastroenterology, 2014;146;1680-1690.e1.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  11. Leithead, JA, Rajoriya, N, Tehami, N, et al. Non-selective beta-blockers are associated with improved survival in patients with ascites listed for liver transplantation. Gut, 2015;64;1111-1119.
    Pubmed CrossRef

Article

Editorial

Gut Liver 2016; 10(1): 10-11

Published online January 31, 2016 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl15576

Copyright © Gut and Liver.

Reappraisal of Antihypertensive Medicine Doxazosin and Carvedilol as a Potential Therapeutic for Hepatic Fibrosis

Yong-Han Paik*,

*Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence to: Yong-Han Paik, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06351, Korea, Tel: +82-2-3410-3878, Fax: +82-2-3410-6983, E-mail: yh.paik@skku.edu

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    References

    1. Paik, YH, Kim, J, Aoyama, T, De Minicis, S, Bataller, R, Brenner, DA. Role of NADPH oxidases in liver fibrosis. Antioxid Redox Signal, 2014;20;2854-2872.
      Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
    2. Mehal, WZ, Schuppan, D. Antifibrotic therapies in the liver. Semin Liver Dis, 2015;35;184-198.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    3. Kim, MY, Cho, MY, Baik, SK, et al. Beneficial effects of candesartan, an angiotensin-blocking agent, on compensated alcoholic liver fibrosis: a randomized open-label controlled study. Liver Int, 2012;32;977-987.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    4. Mu?oz-Ortega, MH, Llamas-Ram?rez, RW, Romero-Delgadillo, NI, et al. Doxazosin treatment attenuates carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in hamsters through a decrease in transforming growth factor beta secretion. Gut Liver, 2016;10;101-108.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    5. Oben, JA, Roskams, T, Yang, S, et al. Hepatic fibrogenesis requires sympathetic neurotransmitters. Gut, 2004;53;438-445.
      Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
    6. Sancho-Bru, P, Bataller, R, Colmenero, J, et al. Norepinephrine induces calcium spikes and proinflammatory actions in human hepatic stellate cells. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol, 2006;291;G877-G884.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    7. Sigala, B, McKee, C, Soeda, J, et al. Sympathetic nervous system catecholamines and neuropeptide Y neurotransmitters are upregulated in human NAFLD and modulate the fibrogenic function of hepatic stellate cells. PLoS One, 2013;8;e72928.
      Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
    8. Sokol, SI, Cheng, A, Frishman, WH, Kaza, CS. Cardiovascular drug therapy in patients with hepatic diseases and patients with congestive heart failure. J Clin Pharmacol, 2000;40;11-30.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    9. Ba?ares, R, Moitinho, E, Matilla, A, et al. Randomized comparison of long-term carvedilol and propranolol administration in the treatment of portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Hepatology, 2002;36;1367-1373.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    10. Mandorfer, M, Bota, S, Schwabl, P, et al. Nonselective beta blockers increase risk for hepatorenal syndrome and death in patients with cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Gastroenterology, 2014;146;1680-1690.e1.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    11. Leithead, JA, Rajoriya, N, Tehami, N, et al. Non-selective beta-blockers are associated with improved survival in patients with ascites listed for liver transplantation. Gut, 2015;64;1111-1119.
      Pubmed CrossRef
    Gut and Liver

    Vol.17 No.1
    January, 2023

    pISSN 1976-2283
    eISSN 2005-1212

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