Gut and Liver 2009; 3(1): 41-47 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2009.3.1.41 Cytapheresis in Patients with Severe Ulcerative Colitis after Failure of Intravenous Corticosteroid: A Long-Term Retrospective Cohort Study
Author Information
Ken Fukunaga*, Kazuko Nagase*, Takeshi Kusaka*, Nobuyuki Hida*, Yoshio Ohda*, Koji Yoshida*, Katsuyuki Tozawa*, Koji Kamikozuru*, M Iimuro*, Shiro Nakamura*, Hiroto Miwa, and Takayuki Matsumoto*
Divisions of *Lower and Upper Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan

Ken Fukunaga
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Cytapheresis (CAP) is a novel strategy for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, there is insufficient data on the long-term outcome of UC patients who achieve remission by CAP. This study involved patients with severe UC who refracted to intravenous (iv) corticosteroid. Methods: Forty-seven UC patients who had received CAP therapy for the first time within 1 year after UC diagnosis were followed for 36 months. One of the inclusion criteria was a clinical activity index (CAI) of ≥7 points at the end of a 2-week iv course of corticosteroid therapy. CAP therapy consisted of ten sessions over 10 weeks. Results: CAP induced clinical remission (CAI≤4) in 70.2% patients (33/47). The number of submissions for colectomy was higher for severe UC at entry (CAI≥12, n=25) than for moderately severe UC at entry (7≤CAI<12, p=15; p<0.02). The cumulative rates of avoiding surgery and relapse were 54.5% and 24.2%, respectively, at 36 months in patients who responded to CAP therapy. This was similar to that of iv cyclosporine reported recently. Conclusions: This study suggest that CAP is an effective therapy in patients who are refractory to conventional medications including iv corticosteroid. Increased remission rates should be expected in refractory patients with moderately severe UC. (Gut and Liver 2009;3:41-47)
Keywords: Inflammatory bowel disease; Corticosteroid; Ulcerative colitis; Leukapheresis
Abstract
Background/Aims: Cytapheresis (CAP) is a novel strategy for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, there is insufficient data on the long-term outcome of UC patients who achieve remission by CAP. This study involved patients with severe UC who refracted to intravenous (iv) corticosteroid. Methods: Forty-seven UC patients who had received CAP therapy for the first time within 1 year after UC diagnosis were followed for 36 months. One of the inclusion criteria was a clinical activity index (CAI) of ≥7 points at the end of a 2-week iv course of corticosteroid therapy. CAP therapy consisted of ten sessions over 10 weeks. Results: CAP induced clinical remission (CAI≤4) in 70.2% patients (33/47). The number of submissions for colectomy was higher for severe UC at entry (CAI≥12, n=25) than for moderately severe UC at entry (7≤CAI<12, p=15; p<0.02). The cumulative rates of avoiding surgery and relapse were 54.5% and 24.2%, respectively, at 36 months in patients who responded to CAP therapy. This was similar to that of iv cyclosporine reported recently. Conclusions: This study suggest that CAP is an effective therapy in patients who are refractory to conventional medications including iv corticosteroid. Increased remission rates should be expected in refractory patients with moderately severe UC. (Gut and Liver 2009;3:41-47)
Keywords: Inflammatory bowel disease; Corticosteroid; Ulcerative colitis; Leukapheresis
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