Gut and Liver 2008; 2(3): 205-208 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2008.2.3.205 Giant Hyperplasia of the Caudate Lobe in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis: Case Report and Literature Review
Author Information
Jeong Ho Choi*, Dae Won Jun*, Han Hyo Lee*, Mun Hee Song*, Seong Hwan Kim*, Yun Ju Jo*, Young Sook Park*, Jun Young Jung*, and Won Mi Lee
*Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Internal Medicine and Pathology, Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Dae Won Jun
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
The caudate lobe often exhibits enlargement and nodularity in cases of cirrhosis, which makes differentiation of hepatocellular carcinoma from other mass- like lesions of the caudate lobe difficult in cirrhotic patients. A 12×6 cm mass-like enlargement of the caudate lobe was incidentally found by computed tomography in a 38-year-old man suffering from alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Magnetic resonance imaging, liver colloidal scan, and sonoguided liver biopsy were used for the differential diagnosis. A literature review revealed two case reports, all of which (like ours) presented with an enlarged caudate lobe supplied with blood via a branch of the portal vein. Therefore, in cases of giant hyperplasia of the caudate lobe, confirmation of the caudate lobe blood supply and the enhancement pattern might be important for the differentiation. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:205-208)
Keywords: Giant hyperplasia; Caudate lobe; Cirrhosis
Abstract
The caudate lobe often exhibits enlargement and nodularity in cases of cirrhosis, which makes differentiation of hepatocellular carcinoma from other mass- like lesions of the caudate lobe difficult in cirrhotic patients. A 12×6 cm mass-like enlargement of the caudate lobe was incidentally found by computed tomography in a 38-year-old man suffering from alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Magnetic resonance imaging, liver colloidal scan, and sonoguided liver biopsy were used for the differential diagnosis. A literature review revealed two case reports, all of which (like ours) presented with an enlarged caudate lobe supplied with blood via a branch of the portal vein. Therefore, in cases of giant hyperplasia of the caudate lobe, confirmation of the caudate lobe blood supply and the enhancement pattern might be important for the differentiation. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:205-208)
Keywords: Giant hyperplasia; Caudate lobe; Cirrhosis
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