Gut and Liver 2008; 2(2): 133-134 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2008.2.2.133 Black Esophagus Associated with Alcohol Abuse
Author Information
Jae Won Hong*,†, Seung Up Kim*,†, Ha Na Park*,†, Ju Hee Seo*,†, Yong Chan Lee*,†, and Hoguen Kim
*Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, and Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Yong Chan Lee
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Black esophagus is a rare condition of the esophagus that manifests as endoscopic findings of black-colored esophageal mucosa, which is usually caused by acute esophageal necrosis. We report a case of alcoholic patient who developed black esophagus. The 85-year- old man was admitted to Severance Hospital due to copious hematemesis over 2 days. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed black-colored mucosa in the distal esophagus. Endoscopic biopsies of the esophagus revealed necrotic tissue, without any viable cells. Follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy performed after supportive care with a proton-pump inhibitor, sucralfate, and total parenteral nutrition resulted in the remarkable healing of the esophageal wall with no complications. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:133-135)
Keywords: Black esophagus; Necrosis; Alcohol abuse
Abstract
Black esophagus is a rare condition of the esophagus that manifests as endoscopic findings of black-colored esophageal mucosa, which is usually caused by acute esophageal necrosis. We report a case of alcoholic patient who developed black esophagus. The 85-year- old man was admitted to Severance Hospital due to copious hematemesis over 2 days. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed black-colored mucosa in the distal esophagus. Endoscopic biopsies of the esophagus revealed necrotic tissue, without any viable cells. Follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy performed after supportive care with a proton-pump inhibitor, sucralfate, and total parenteral nutrition resulted in the remarkable healing of the esophageal wall with no complications. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:133-135)
Keywords: Black esophagus; Necrosis; Alcohol abuse
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