Gut and Liver 2008; 2(2): 105-112 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2008.2.2.105 Endoscopic Sedation in Developing and Developed Countries
Author Information
Ariel A. Benson, Lawrence B. Cohen*, Jerome D. Waye*, Alaleh Akhavan, and James Aisenberg*
*Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Digestive Disease Research Foundation, New York, USA

Lawrence B. Cohen
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Data are scarce on endoscopic sedation practices outside the United States and Western Europe, particularly from developing nations. An Internet survey was used to assess endoscopic sedation practices in developing and developed countries. Methods: Responses to a Web-based survey of sedation practices from 165 expert endoscopists from 81 countries were analyzed. The most common sedation method was defined as that used for >50% of endoscopies within a country. Results: Responses were received from 84 endoscopists practicing in 46 countries (51% response rate; 32 responses from 22 developing countries and 52 responses from 24 developed countries). A combination of benzodiazepine and opioid was the most common method for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in 40% of the countries and for colonoscopy in 56% of the countries. For propofol and unsedated endoscopy, the corresponding figures were 8% and 19% for EGD and 18% and 10% for colonoscopy. No single sedation method accounted for >50% of EGD and colonoscopy cases in 32% and 17% of the countries, respectively. There were no significant differences in the proportions of developing and developed countries using combined benzodiazepine and opioid, propofol, or unsedated endoscopy. Conclusions: Sedation is used for most endoscopic procedures worldwide, with sedation practice not differing significantly between developing and developed countries. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:105-112)
Keywords: Endoscopy; Sedation; Survey
Abstract
Background/Aims: Data are scarce on endoscopic sedation practices outside the United States and Western Europe, particularly from developing nations. An Internet survey was used to assess endoscopic sedation practices in developing and developed countries. Methods: Responses to a Web-based survey of sedation practices from 165 expert endoscopists from 81 countries were analyzed. The most common sedation method was defined as that used for >50% of endoscopies within a country. Results: Responses were received from 84 endoscopists practicing in 46 countries (51% response rate; 32 responses from 22 developing countries and 52 responses from 24 developed countries). A combination of benzodiazepine and opioid was the most common method for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in 40% of the countries and for colonoscopy in 56% of the countries. For propofol and unsedated endoscopy, the corresponding figures were 8% and 19% for EGD and 18% and 10% for colonoscopy. No single sedation method accounted for >50% of EGD and colonoscopy cases in 32% and 17% of the countries, respectively. There were no significant differences in the proportions of developing and developed countries using combined benzodiazepine and opioid, propofol, or unsedated endoscopy. Conclusions: Sedation is used for most endoscopic procedures worldwide, with sedation practice not differing significantly between developing and developed countries. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:105-112)
Keywords: Endoscopy; Sedation; Survey
Search for
Services
Archives