Gut and Liver 2008; 2(1): 39-46 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2008.2.1.39 Adenosine Receptor Agonists Modulate Visceral Hyperalgesia in the Rat
Author Information
Chong-Il Sohn*, Hyo Jin Park, and G. F. Gebhart
*Department of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Center for Pain Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Chong-Il Sohn
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Adenosine is an endogenous modulator of nociception. Its role in visceral nociception, particularly in visceral hyperalgesia, has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adenosine receptor agonists in a model of visceral hyperalgesia. Methods: The visceromotor response (VMR) in rats to colorectal distension (CRD; 80 mmHg, 20 seconds) was quantified by electromyographic recordings from the abdominal musculature. Three hours after the intracolonic administration of zymosan (25 mg/mL, 1 mL), VMRs to CRD were measured before and after either subcutaneous or intrathecal administration of an adenosine receptor agonist. Results: Subcutaneous injection of 5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA; an A1 and A2 receptor agonist), R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; a selective A1 receptor agonist), or CGS-21680 hydrochloride (a selective A2a receptor agonist) dose-dependently (10-100 mg/kg) attenuated the VMR to CRD, although hindlimb weakness occurred at the higher doses tested. Intrathecal administration of NECA or R-PIA dose-dependently (0.1-1.0Ռg/kg) decreased the VMR, whereas CGS-21680 hydrochloride was ineffective over the same concentration range. Higher intrathecal doses of the A1/A2 receptor agonist NECA produced motor weakness. Conclusions: Adenosine receptor agonists are antihyperalgesic, but also produce motor weakness at high doses. However, activation of the spinal A1 receptor significantly attenuates the VMR to CRD without producing motor weakness. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:39-46)
Keywords: Adenosine; Visceral; Hyperalgesia
Abstract
Background/Aims: Adenosine is an endogenous modulator of nociception. Its role in visceral nociception, particularly in visceral hyperalgesia, has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adenosine receptor agonists in a model of visceral hyperalgesia. Methods: The visceromotor response (VMR) in rats to colorectal distension (CRD; 80 mmHg, 20 seconds) was quantified by electromyographic recordings from the abdominal musculature. Three hours after the intracolonic administration of zymosan (25 mg/mL, 1 mL), VMRs to CRD were measured before and after either subcutaneous or intrathecal administration of an adenosine receptor agonist. Results: Subcutaneous injection of 5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA; an A1 and A2 receptor agonist), R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; a selective A1 receptor agonist), or CGS-21680 hydrochloride (a selective A2a receptor agonist) dose-dependently (10-100 mg/kg) attenuated the VMR to CRD, although hindlimb weakness occurred at the higher doses tested. Intrathecal administration of NECA or R-PIA dose-dependently (0.1-1.0Ռg/kg) decreased the VMR, whereas CGS-21680 hydrochloride was ineffective over the same concentration range. Higher intrathecal doses of the A1/A2 receptor agonist NECA produced motor weakness. Conclusions: Adenosine receptor agonists are antihyperalgesic, but also produce motor weakness at high doses. However, activation of the spinal A1 receptor significantly attenuates the VMR to CRD without producing motor weakness. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:39-46)
Keywords: Adenosine; Visceral; Hyperalgesia
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