Gut and Liver 2008; 2(1): 30-38 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2008.2.1.30 Comparative Efficacy of Rabeprazole and Pantoprazole in the Control of Nocturnal Acid Output and Intragastric Acidity
Author Information
Hank S. Wang*, David S. Oh*,†, Ariana Anderson, Jose Nieto*,†, Phuong Tien, Gordon Ohning*,†, and Joseph R. Pisegna*,†
*Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System and Department of Statistics, UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA

Joseph R. Pisegna
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Nocturnal reflux is a largely undiagnosed and unmanaged condition predisposing to multiple esophageal complications. We evaluated the effects of rabeprazole and pantoprazole on nocturnal intragastric pH and gastric acid output during Day 1 of therapy following the consumption of standard meals. Methods: The study had a double-blinded, randomized, two-way crossover design, and involved 15 patients with a history of mild reflux. Following an overnight fast, patients were given either rabeprazole (20 mg) or pantoprazole (40 mg) prior to the first of three standard Western meals. They then underwent overnight continuous intragastric pH monitoring and gastric acid output measurement. The drug effect was analyzed using a two-treatment, two-period crossover mixed model. Results: The percentage of time during which the mean intragastric pH was greater than 4.0 and gastric acid output was less than 2.0 was higher for oral rabeprazole (p<0.05). The inhibition of acid output was greater for rabeprazole at almost all time points. Furthermore, the mean time-matched pH values differed significantly over the first 8.3 hours (p<0.05). Conclusions: On day 1, oral rabeprazole inhibited acid output to a greater extent and for a longer period than pantoprazole, and the intragastric pH was significantly higher for rabeprazole than for pantoprazole over the first 8.3 hours. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:30-38)
Keywords: Nocturnal; Reflux; Acid; Rabeprazole; Pantoprazole
Abstract
Background/Aims: Nocturnal reflux is a largely undiagnosed and unmanaged condition predisposing to multiple esophageal complications. We evaluated the effects of rabeprazole and pantoprazole on nocturnal intragastric pH and gastric acid output during Day 1 of therapy following the consumption of standard meals. Methods: The study had a double-blinded, randomized, two-way crossover design, and involved 15 patients with a history of mild reflux. Following an overnight fast, patients were given either rabeprazole (20 mg) or pantoprazole (40 mg) prior to the first of three standard Western meals. They then underwent overnight continuous intragastric pH monitoring and gastric acid output measurement. The drug effect was analyzed using a two-treatment, two-period crossover mixed model. Results: The percentage of time during which the mean intragastric pH was greater than 4.0 and gastric acid output was less than 2.0 was higher for oral rabeprazole (p<0.05). The inhibition of acid output was greater for rabeprazole at almost all time points. Furthermore, the mean time-matched pH values differed significantly over the first 8.3 hours (p<0.05). Conclusions: On day 1, oral rabeprazole inhibited acid output to a greater extent and for a longer period than pantoprazole, and the intragastric pH was significantly higher for rabeprazole than for pantoprazole over the first 8.3 hours. (Gut and Liver 2008;2:30-38)
Keywords: Nocturnal; Reflux; Acid; Rabeprazole; Pantoprazole
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