Gut and Liver 2008; 2(1): 14-18 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2008.2.1.14 Optical Microangiography: High-Definition Magnification Colonoscopy with Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) for Visualizing Mucosal Capillaries and Red Blood Cells in the Large Intestine
Author Information
Kenshi Yao*, George K. Anagnostopoulos*, Aida U. Jawhari*, Philip V. Kaye, Chris J. Hawkey*, and Krish Ragunath*
*Wolfson Digestive Disease Centre, Queen's Medical Centre Campus, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom, Department of Pathology, Queen's Medical Centre Campus, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Kenshi Yao
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Recent advances in zoom endoscopy have enabled the subepithelial capillary network (SECN) in different organs of the gastrointestinal tract to be visualized. Ex vivo studies have suggested that the SECN demonstrates a honeycomb-like structure in the large intestine, but this has not yet been visualized in vivo. The high clarity and resolution of narrow-band imaging (NBI) may allow visualization at the single red-blood-cell (RBC) level and more accurate visualization of the SECN. We investigated whether high-definition magnification colonoscopy with NBI is useful for visualizing capillaries and RBCs in the large intestine. Methods: Sixteen patients with bowel symptoms undergoing routine colonoscopy with normal findings in a tertiary referral academic gastroenterology and endoscopy unit were included in the study. Total colonoscopies were performed using a high-definition magnification colonoscope (CF-H260AZI, Olympus, Tokyo) and a prototype high-definition electronic endoscopy system capable of NBI. Each part of the large intestine (cecum, ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon, and rectum) was observed at the maximum magnification with white-light imaging (WLI) and NBI. The normal honeycomb-like SECN and RBC movement by high-definition magnification colonoscopy with either WLI or NBI was prospectively successfully visualized for each part of the large intestine. Results: In all subjects, high-definition magnification colonoscopy with NBI allowed the visualization of a honeycomb-like SECN together with RBC movement in each segment of the large intestine except for the rectum. In contrast, with WLI alone, neither this SECN structure nor RBC movement could be detected. Conclusions: High-definition magnification colonoscopy with NBI could be a new optical method for facilitating noninvasive investigations of both the microvascular architecture and microcirculation without the need for contrast materials. (Gut and Liver 2008; 2:14-18)
Keywords: Optical; colonoscopy; Capillary; Red blood cell; Large intestine
Abstract
Background/Aims: Recent advances in zoom endoscopy have enabled the subepithelial capillary network (SECN) in different organs of the gastrointestinal tract to be visualized. Ex vivo studies have suggested that the SECN demonstrates a honeycomb-like structure in the large intestine, but this has not yet been visualized in vivo. The high clarity and resolution of narrow-band imaging (NBI) may allow visualization at the single red-blood-cell (RBC) level and more accurate visualization of the SECN. We investigated whether high-definition magnification colonoscopy with NBI is useful for visualizing capillaries and RBCs in the large intestine. Methods: Sixteen patients with bowel symptoms undergoing routine colonoscopy with normal findings in a tertiary referral academic gastroenterology and endoscopy unit were included in the study. Total colonoscopies were performed using a high-definition magnification colonoscope (CF-H260AZI, Olympus, Tokyo) and a prototype high-definition electronic endoscopy system capable of NBI. Each part of the large intestine (cecum, ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon, and rectum) was observed at the maximum magnification with white-light imaging (WLI) and NBI. The normal honeycomb-like SECN and RBC movement by high-definition magnification colonoscopy with either WLI or NBI was prospectively successfully visualized for each part of the large intestine. Results: In all subjects, high-definition magnification colonoscopy with NBI allowed the visualization of a honeycomb-like SECN together with RBC movement in each segment of the large intestine except for the rectum. In contrast, with WLI alone, neither this SECN structure nor RBC movement could be detected. Conclusions: High-definition magnification colonoscopy with NBI could be a new optical method for facilitating noninvasive investigations of both the microvascular architecture and microcirculation without the need for contrast materials. (Gut and Liver 2008; 2:14-18)
Keywords: Optical; colonoscopy; Capillary; Red blood cell; Large intestine
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