Gut and Liver 2007; 1(2): 93-100 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2007.1.2.93 Barrett's Esophagus: Diagnosis, Screening, Surveillance, and Controversies
Author Information
Rajvinder Singh*, Krish Ragunath*, and Janusz Jankowski
*Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, University Hospital Nottingham; and UHL Trust and Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Oxford, UK

Janusz Jankowski
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a frequent complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, an acquired condition resulting from persistent mucosal injury to the esophagus. The incidence of Barrett's metaplasia and Barrett's adenocarcinoma has been increasing, but the prognosis of Barrett's adenocarcinoma is worse because individuals present at a late stage. Attempts have been made to intervene at early stage using surveillance programmes, although proof of efficacy of endoscopic surveillance is lacking. There is much to be learned about BE. Whether adequate control of gastroesophageal reflux early in the disease alters the natural history of Barrett's change once it has developed remains unanswered. Thus there is great need for carefully designed large randomised controlled trials to address these issues in order to determine how best to manage patients with BE. The AspECT and BOSS clinical trials proride this basis. (Gut and Liver 2007;1:93-100)
Keywords: Barrett's esophagus; Gastroesophageal reflux
Abstract
Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a frequent complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, an acquired condition resulting from persistent mucosal injury to the esophagus. The incidence of Barrett's metaplasia and Barrett's adenocarcinoma has been increasing, but the prognosis of Barrett's adenocarcinoma is worse because individuals present at a late stage. Attempts have been made to intervene at early stage using surveillance programmes, although proof of efficacy of endoscopic surveillance is lacking. There is much to be learned about BE. Whether adequate control of gastroesophageal reflux early in the disease alters the natural history of Barrett's change once it has developed remains unanswered. Thus there is great need for carefully designed large randomised controlled trials to address these issues in order to determine how best to manage patients with BE. The AspECT and BOSS clinical trials proride this basis. (Gut and Liver 2007;1:93-100)
Keywords: Barrett's esophagus; Gastroesophageal reflux
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