Gut and Liver 2011; 5(1): 70-76 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2011.5.1.70 Association between Hepatitis B Virus X Gene Mutations and Clinical Status in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection
Author Information
Eun Young Cho*, Chang Soo Choi*, Ji-Hyun Cho, and Haak Cheoul Kim*
Departments of *Internal Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, Wonkwang University Hospital, Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan, Korea

Haak Cheoul Kim
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Few reports have described the association between mutations in the entire X gene of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the clinical status of HBV-infected patients. We studied the association between HBV X gene mutations and the disease status of patients infected with HBV genotype C. Methods: Mutations in the HBV X genes of 194 patients were determined by direct sequencing. The subject population consisted of patients with chronic hepatitis (n=60), liver cirrhosis (n=65), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n=69). The sequencing results of these 3 groups were compared. Results: Each of the mutations G1386M, C1485T, C1653T, T1753V, A1762T, and G1764A was signifi cantly associated with the patient' clinical status. The T1753V (p<0.001) and A1762T/G1764A (p<0.001) mutations were found more frequently in Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative than in HBeAg-positive patients. Specifi c X gene mutations (G1386M, C1653T, and A1762T/ G1764A) were more prevalent in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC than in chronic hepatitis patients (p<0.005 for all). In addition, the T1753V (p<0.001) and C1485T (p<0.001) mutations were signifi cantly more prevalent in HCC patients than in chronic hepatitis patients. Only the prevalence of the T1753V mutation increased as the HBV infection progressed from liver cirrhosis to HCC (p=0.023). Conclusions: Our fi ndings show a difference in the pattern of X gene mutations that were associated with the clinical status of patients with chronic HBV infection. (Gut Liver 2011;5:70-76)
Keywords: Hepatitis B virus; Hepatocellular carcinoma; Cirrhosis; Liver disease; X mutation
Abstract
Background/Aims: Few reports have described the association between mutations in the entire X gene of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the clinical status of HBV-infected patients. We studied the association between HBV X gene mutations and the disease status of patients infected with HBV genotype C. Methods: Mutations in the HBV X genes of 194 patients were determined by direct sequencing. The subject population consisted of patients with chronic hepatitis (n=60), liver cirrhosis (n=65), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n=69). The sequencing results of these 3 groups were compared. Results: Each of the mutations G1386M, C1485T, C1653T, T1753V, A1762T, and G1764A was signifi cantly associated with the patient' clinical status. The T1753V (p<0.001) and A1762T/G1764A (p<0.001) mutations were found more frequently in Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative than in HBeAg-positive patients. Specifi c X gene mutations (G1386M, C1653T, and A1762T/ G1764A) were more prevalent in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC than in chronic hepatitis patients (p<0.005 for all). In addition, the T1753V (p<0.001) and C1485T (p<0.001) mutations were signifi cantly more prevalent in HCC patients than in chronic hepatitis patients. Only the prevalence of the T1753V mutation increased as the HBV infection progressed from liver cirrhosis to HCC (p=0.023). Conclusions: Our fi ndings show a difference in the pattern of X gene mutations that were associated with the clinical status of patients with chronic HBV infection. (Gut Liver 2011;5:70-76)
Keywords: Hepatitis B virus; Hepatocellular carcinoma; Cirrhosis; Liver disease; X mutation
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