Gut and Liver 2011; 5(1): 22-28 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2011.5.1.22 Probiotic Fermented Milk Containing Dietary Fiber Has Additive Effects in IBS with Constipation Compared to Plain Probiotic Fer-mented Milk
Author Information
Sung Chul Choi*, Beom Jin Kim, Poong-Lyul Rhee*, Dong Kyung Chang*, Hee Jung Son*, Jae J. Kim*, Jong Chul Rhee*, Soon Im Kim, Young Sil Han, Ki Hyeon Sim§, and Seok Nam ParkII
*Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Nano Bio-Resources Center, §Department of Food and Nutrition, Sookmyung Women' University, Seoul, and IIR&D Center, NamYang Dairy Products Co., Ltd., Gongju, Korea

Poong-Lyul Rhee
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Although controversial, probiotics and dietary fiber are commonly used for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated the effects of multistrain probiotics on the symptoms of IBS to determine whether the addition of dietary fi ber had an additive effect on constipation-predominant IBS. Methods: A total of 142 participants who met the Rome III criteria were recruited and randomized into a control group or a test group. Participants in the control group received multistrain probiotic fermented milk with Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifi dobacterium infantis; the participants in the test group received the same probiotic fermented milk mixed with dietary fi ber such as sea tangle extracts, radish extracts and glasswort extracts. The patients were treated for four weeks. Results: Most of the symptoms of IBS, with the exception of fl atulence, stool consistency, and frequency of defecation, signifi cantly improved in both groups. In the analysis of IBS subtypes, especially constipation-predominant IBS, the frequency and duration of defecation and straining at stool were improved more in the test group than in the control group. Conclusions: Dietary fiber had additive benefits for the symptoms of constipation, especially in constipationpredominant IBS. (Gut Liver 2011;5:22-28)
Keywords: Constipation; Dietary fiber; Irritable bowel syndrome; Probiotic fermented milk
Abstract
Background/Aims: Although controversial, probiotics and dietary fiber are commonly used for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated the effects of multistrain probiotics on the symptoms of IBS to determine whether the addition of dietary fi ber had an additive effect on constipation-predominant IBS. Methods: A total of 142 participants who met the Rome III criteria were recruited and randomized into a control group or a test group. Participants in the control group received multistrain probiotic fermented milk with Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifi dobacterium infantis; the participants in the test group received the same probiotic fermented milk mixed with dietary fi ber such as sea tangle extracts, radish extracts and glasswort extracts. The patients were treated for four weeks. Results: Most of the symptoms of IBS, with the exception of fl atulence, stool consistency, and frequency of defecation, signifi cantly improved in both groups. In the analysis of IBS subtypes, especially constipation-predominant IBS, the frequency and duration of defecation and straining at stool were improved more in the test group than in the control group. Conclusions: Dietary fiber had additive benefits for the symptoms of constipation, especially in constipationpredominant IBS. (Gut Liver 2011;5:22-28)
Keywords: Constipation; Dietary fiber; Irritable bowel syndrome; Probiotic fermented milk
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