Gut and Liver 2011; 5(1): 110-114 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2011.5.1.110 Delayed Viral Clearance of Chronic Hepatitis C in Patients after Treatment Failure
Author Information
Su Hyun Cho, Sung Wook Lee, Seok Reyol Choi, Sang Young Han, Myung Hwan Roh, Jong Hoon Lee, Jin Seok Jang, Yang Hyun Baek, and Su Young Kim
Department of Internal Medicine, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea

Sung Wook Lee
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection usually progresses to chronic hepatitis, with rare cases of spontaneous viral eradication. We present herein four cases involving patients that were initially declared to have failed to respond to treatments, based on the presence of HCV RNA that was still detectable after completion of the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C with genotype 2. However, the HCV RNA became undetectable, with a delayed response, after discontinuation of therapy. Two of the four patients were diagnosed as treatment failures after extended treatment, and the other two received no further treatment after the standard treatment. All four patients maintained a sustained virological response during the periodic follow-up after delayed viral clearance. (Gut Liver 2011;5:110-114)
Keywords: Delayed viral clearance; Chronic hepatitis C; Sustained virological response
Abstract
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection usually progresses to chronic hepatitis, with rare cases of spontaneous viral eradication. We present herein four cases involving patients that were initially declared to have failed to respond to treatments, based on the presence of HCV RNA that was still detectable after completion of the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C with genotype 2. However, the HCV RNA became undetectable, with a delayed response, after discontinuation of therapy. Two of the four patients were diagnosed as treatment failures after extended treatment, and the other two received no further treatment after the standard treatment. All four patients maintained a sustained virological response during the periodic follow-up after delayed viral clearance. (Gut Liver 2011;5:110-114)
Keywords: Delayed viral clearance; Chronic hepatitis C; Sustained virological response
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