Gut and Liver 2010; 4(4): 551-555 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.4.551 Liver Cirrhosis Induced by Porphyria Cutanea Tarda: A Case Report and Review
Author Information
Kwang Gyun Lee*, Jong Jin Hyun*, Yeon Seok Seo*, Bora Keum*, Hyung Joon Yim*, Yoon Tae Jeen*, Hong Sik Lee*, Hoon Jai Chun*, Chang Duck Kim*, Ho Sang Ryu*, and Soon Ho Um*,†
*Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Korea

Soon Ho Um
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is a metabolic disorder that results in a decrease in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity. It is characterized by photosensitivity, bullae formation, and skin pigmentation. There are four types of PCT: acquired, familial, toxic, and hepatoerythropoietic. Uroporphyrin levels are elevated in the urine of PCT patients. PCT can be differentiated from other porphyrias by its clinical characteristics and the porphyrin levels in the serum, erythrocytes, urine, and feces. This metabolic disorder can lead to liver dysfunction as well as histological changes such as fatty infiltration or hepatic fibrosis. PCT rarely manifests as liver cirrhosis. We report herein a case of PCT-induced liver cirrhosis that progressed to hepatic failure. (Gut Liver 2010;4:551-555)
Keywords: Porphyria cutanea tarda; Uroporphyrin; Metabolic disorder; Liver cirrhosis
Abstract
Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is a metabolic disorder that results in a decrease in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity. It is characterized by photosensitivity, bullae formation, and skin pigmentation. There are four types of PCT: acquired, familial, toxic, and hepatoerythropoietic. Uroporphyrin levels are elevated in the urine of PCT patients. PCT can be differentiated from other porphyrias by its clinical characteristics and the porphyrin levels in the serum, erythrocytes, urine, and feces. This metabolic disorder can lead to liver dysfunction as well as histological changes such as fatty infiltration or hepatic fibrosis. PCT rarely manifests as liver cirrhosis. We report herein a case of PCT-induced liver cirrhosis that progressed to hepatic failure. (Gut Liver 2010;4:551-555)
Keywords: Porphyria cutanea tarda; Uroporphyrin; Metabolic disorder; Liver cirrhosis
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