Gut and Liver 2007; 1(2): 159-164 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2007.1.2.159 Effect of Propranolol on Portal Pressure and Systemic Hemodynamics in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension: A Prospective Study
Author Information
Ki Tae Suk, Moon Young Kim, Dong Hun Park, Kyu Hong Kim, Ki Won Jo, Jin Hon Hong, Jae Woo Kim, Hyun Soo Kim, Sang Ok Kwon, and Soon Koo Baik
Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Lifelong Health, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea

Soon Koo Baik
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Propranolol can prevent variceal bleeding by ameliorating portal hypertension. We conducted this study to determine the effect of propranolol on portal hypertension and the optimal required dose in Korean cirrhotic patients. Methods: This study prospectively evaluated 50 patients with cirrhosis who exhibited variceal bleeding. The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), portal venous flow, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure were assessed both at baseline and at 3 months after the treatment. The initial dose of propranolol (20 mg) was subsequently adjusted until the target HR was reached. Patients in whom HVPG reduced by >20% or to less than 12 mmHg were defined as responders. Results: Propranolol significantly (p<0.01) reduced the HVPG (-21±26%, mean±standard deviation), portal venous flow (-25±21%), HR (-20±13%), and blood pressure (-3±13%). Twenty-nine patients were responders, and the optimal required dose was 154.4 mg. The main complication was dizziness (24%), but this was not serious enough to require medication withdrawal. Conclusions: Propranolol is safe and effective at reducing portal pressure in Korean cirrhotic patients. An effective improvement in portal hypertension requires the dose to be increased until the target HR is reached. (Gut and Liver 2007;1:159-164)
Keywords: Propranolol; Portal hypertension; Liver cirrhosis; Pressure
Abstract
Background/Aims: Propranolol can prevent variceal bleeding by ameliorating portal hypertension. We conducted this study to determine the effect of propranolol on portal hypertension and the optimal required dose in Korean cirrhotic patients. Methods: This study prospectively evaluated 50 patients with cirrhosis who exhibited variceal bleeding. The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), portal venous flow, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure were assessed both at baseline and at 3 months after the treatment. The initial dose of propranolol (20 mg) was subsequently adjusted until the target HR was reached. Patients in whom HVPG reduced by >20% or to less than 12 mmHg were defined as responders. Results: Propranolol significantly (p<0.01) reduced the HVPG (-21±26%, mean±standard deviation), portal venous flow (-25±21%), HR (-20±13%), and blood pressure (-3±13%). Twenty-nine patients were responders, and the optimal required dose was 154.4 mg. The main complication was dizziness (24%), but this was not serious enough to require medication withdrawal. Conclusions: Propranolol is safe and effective at reducing portal pressure in Korean cirrhotic patients. An effective improvement in portal hypertension requires the dose to be increased until the target HR is reached. (Gut and Liver 2007;1:159-164)
Keywords: Propranolol; Portal hypertension; Liver cirrhosis; Pressure
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