Gut and Liver 2010; 4(3): 378-383 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.3.378 Serum Uric Acid as a Predictor for the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Apparently Healthy Subjects: A 5-Year Retrospective Cohort Study
Author Information
Jae Woong Lee*, Yong Kyun Cho*, MC Ryan†, Hyang Kim‡, Seung Won Lee*, Eugene Chang*, Kwan Joong Joo§, Jung Tae Kim∥, Bum Soo Kim¶, and Ki Chul Sung¶
*Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, †Department of Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, Divisions of ‡Nephrology, §Urology, ∥Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, and ¶Cardiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Ki Chul Sung
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: This study evaluated the relationship between hyperuricemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by comparing the incidence rates of NAFLD in relation to serum uric acid levels in apparently healthy subjects during a 5-year period. Methods: Among 15,638 healthy Korean subjects who participated in a health-screening program in 2003 and 2008, respectively, 4954 subjects without other risk factors were enrolled in this study. We compared the incidence rates of NAFLD in 2008 with respect to baseline uric acid levels. Results: In 2003, serum uric acid levels were categorized into the following quartiles: 0.6-3.9, 3.9-4.8, 4.8-5.9, and 5.9-12.6 mg/dL. The incidence of NAFLD in 2008 increased with the level of baseline uric acid (5.6%, 9.8%, 16.2%, and 20.9%, respectively; p<0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that hyperuricemia was associated with the development of NAFLD. When compared to the subjects in quartile 1, the odds ratio (OR) for the incidence of NAFLD for quartiles 2, 3, and 4 were 1.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-2.16; p=0.014], 1.69 (95% CI, 1.17-2.44; p=0.005), and 1.84 (95% CI, 1.25-2.71; p=0.002), respectively. Conclusions: High serum uric acid levels appear to be associated with an increased risk of the development of NAFLD. (Gut Liver 2010;4: 378-383)
Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Uric acid; Metabolic syndrome
Abstract
Background/Aims: This study evaluated the relationship between hyperuricemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by comparing the incidence rates of NAFLD in relation to serum uric acid levels in apparently healthy subjects during a 5-year period. Methods: Among 15,638 healthy Korean subjects who participated in a health-screening program in 2003 and 2008, respectively, 4954 subjects without other risk factors were enrolled in this study. We compared the incidence rates of NAFLD in 2008 with respect to baseline uric acid levels. Results: In 2003, serum uric acid levels were categorized into the following quartiles: 0.6-3.9, 3.9-4.8, 4.8-5.9, and 5.9-12.6 mg/dL. The incidence of NAFLD in 2008 increased with the level of baseline uric acid (5.6%, 9.8%, 16.2%, and 20.9%, respectively; p<0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that hyperuricemia was associated with the development of NAFLD. When compared to the subjects in quartile 1, the odds ratio (OR) for the incidence of NAFLD for quartiles 2, 3, and 4 were 1.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-2.16; p=0.014], 1.69 (95% CI, 1.17-2.44; p=0.005), and 1.84 (95% CI, 1.25-2.71; p=0.002), respectively. Conclusions: High serum uric acid levels appear to be associated with an increased risk of the development of NAFLD. (Gut Liver 2010;4: 378-383)
Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Uric acid; Metabolic syndrome
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