Gut and Liver 2010; 4(3): 368-372 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.3.368 Effect of Transdermal Fentanyl Patches on the Motility of the Sphincter of Oddi
Author Information
Hyun Cheol Koo, Jong Ho Moon, Hyun Jong Choi, Kyoung Hwa Hwang, Hyo Jin Maeng, Hyung Ki Kim, Jong Kyu Park, Su Jin Hong, Young Koog Cheon, Young Deok Cho, Joon Seong Lee, and Moon Sung Lee
Digestive Disease Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University School of Medicine, Bucheon and Seoul, Korea

Jong Ho Moon
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Pain is one of the most troublesome symptoms of pancreatitis. Transdermal fentanyl patches (TFPs) are long-acting analgesics with a reduced risk of dependency. This prospective study evaluated the effect of TFPs on sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility for the management of pain in pancreatitis. Methods: SO manometry (SOM) was performed using triple-lumen catheters anterogradely inserted through the percutaneous transhepatic route during cholangioscopy in 16 patients. The basal pressure, amplitude, and frequency of the SO were assessed before and after applying a TFP at 24 hour at doses of 25 and 12.5Ռg/hr, respectively. Results: Two of 16 patients receiving a 25Ռg/hr. TFP were excluded because of adverse side effects (headache and/or nausea). The mean basal pressure, amplitude, and frequency of SOM did not change significantly in the 25Ռg/hr TFP group (n=4 patients). Parameters of SO function also did not significantly change in the 12.5Ռg/hr TFP group (n=11 patients). Conclusions: TFPs below a dose of 25Ռg/hr may not affect the motility of the SO. Administration of TFPs at lower dosages seems to be a safe analgesic treatment for the pain control of patients with pancreatitis without affecting the function of the SO. (Gut Liver 2010;4: 368-372)
Keywords: Sphincter of Oddi manometry; Transdermal fentanyl patch; Pancreatitis
Abstract
Background/Aims: Pain is one of the most troublesome symptoms of pancreatitis. Transdermal fentanyl patches (TFPs) are long-acting analgesics with a reduced risk of dependency. This prospective study evaluated the effect of TFPs on sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility for the management of pain in pancreatitis. Methods: SO manometry (SOM) was performed using triple-lumen catheters anterogradely inserted through the percutaneous transhepatic route during cholangioscopy in 16 patients. The basal pressure, amplitude, and frequency of the SO were assessed before and after applying a TFP at 24 hour at doses of 25 and 12.5Ռg/hr, respectively. Results: Two of 16 patients receiving a 25Ռg/hr. TFP were excluded because of adverse side effects (headache and/or nausea). The mean basal pressure, amplitude, and frequency of SOM did not change significantly in the 25Ռg/hr TFP group (n=4 patients). Parameters of SO function also did not significantly change in the 12.5Ռg/hr TFP group (n=11 patients). Conclusions: TFPs below a dose of 25Ռg/hr may not affect the motility of the SO. Administration of TFPs at lower dosages seems to be a safe analgesic treatment for the pain control of patients with pancreatitis without affecting the function of the SO. (Gut Liver 2010;4: 368-372)
Keywords: Sphincter of Oddi manometry; Transdermal fentanyl patch; Pancreatitis
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