Gut and Liver 2010; 4(3): 351-356 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.3.351 Secondary Appendiceal Tumors: A Review of 139 Cases
Author Information
Won Jae Yoon*, Yong Bum Yoon*, Youn Joo Kim†, Ji Kon Ryu*, and Yong-Tae Kim*
Department of Internal Medicine, *Seoul National University College of Medicine, and †Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, Korea

Yong Bum Yoon
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: This study evaluated the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with secondary appendiceal tumors (SATs). Methods: We performed a single-center, retrospective study of patients with pathologically confirmed SATs. Results: Among 180 cases of appendiceal malignancies diagnosed between 2000 and 2007, 139 cases (77.2%, 46 male) were SATs. The median age at SAT diagnosis was 55 years. The most common primary origin was the ovary. The mode of appendiceal involvement was metastasis in 122 and invasion in 17 patients. Extra- appendiceal involvement was present in 134 patients. The only manifestation that could be attributed to the SAT itself was appendicitis (n=8). Serosal involvement was predominant. The median survival after diagnosis of SAT was 22.6 months. In the Cox regression analysis, chemotherapy included in the treatment was the only factor associated with prolonged survival (hazards ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.23; p<0.001). Complete resection of the SAT had no influence on survival. Conclusions: SATs accounted for 77.2% of all pathologically diagnosed appendiceal malignancies. The most common origin was the ovary. SATs were usually associated with widespread disease, and the median survival after SAT diagnosis was 22.6 months. Complete resection of the SAT had no influence on survival. (Gut Liver 2010;4:351-356)
Keywords: Neoplasms; Appendix; Secondary
Abstract
Background/Aims: This study evaluated the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with secondary appendiceal tumors (SATs). Methods: We performed a single-center, retrospective study of patients with pathologically confirmed SATs. Results: Among 180 cases of appendiceal malignancies diagnosed between 2000 and 2007, 139 cases (77.2%, 46 male) were SATs. The median age at SAT diagnosis was 55 years. The most common primary origin was the ovary. The mode of appendiceal involvement was metastasis in 122 and invasion in 17 patients. Extra- appendiceal involvement was present in 134 patients. The only manifestation that could be attributed to the SAT itself was appendicitis (n=8). Serosal involvement was predominant. The median survival after diagnosis of SAT was 22.6 months. In the Cox regression analysis, chemotherapy included in the treatment was the only factor associated with prolonged survival (hazards ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.23; p<0.001). Complete resection of the SAT had no influence on survival. Conclusions: SATs accounted for 77.2% of all pathologically diagnosed appendiceal malignancies. The most common origin was the ovary. SATs were usually associated with widespread disease, and the median survival after SAT diagnosis was 22.6 months. Complete resection of the SAT had no influence on survival. (Gut Liver 2010;4:351-356)
Keywords: Neoplasms; Appendix; Secondary
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