Gut and Liver 2010; 4(2): 278-282 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.2.278 Spontaneous Rupture of a Gastric Stromal Tumor Causing Hemoperitoneum
Author Information
Gun Wha Lee*, Young Seok Kim*, Sang Gyune Kim*, Bong Min Ko*, Moon Sung Lee*, Kyu Seok Cho, Seong Jin Park, and Hee Kyung Kim§
Departments of *Internal Medicine, General Surgery, Radiology, and §Anatomic Pathology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea

Young Seok Kim
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
We describe a 39-year-old man with spontaneous rupture of a gastric stromal tumor causing hemoperitoneum. Ultrasonography showed a large mass broadly abutting the stomach and liver. Computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneous enhanced mass arising from the stomach and focal perforation of the tumor with hemoperitoneum; endoscopic ultrasonography showed an exophytic heterogeneous mass originating from the gastric muscle layer. Angiography revealed that the right gastric artery was the main artery supplying the tumor. A gastric stromal tumor with bloody fluid in the peritoneal cavity was seen at the laparotomy. The tumor was excised completely, and subsequent histological and immunohistochemical studies indicated that it was a gastric stromal tumor. We report a relatively rare case of gastric stromal tumor causing hemoperitoneum due to spontaneous rupture of the tumor. (Gut Liver 2010;4:278-282)
Keywords: Gastric stromal tumor; Hemoperitoneum; Spontaneous rupture
Abstract
We describe a 39-year-old man with spontaneous rupture of a gastric stromal tumor causing hemoperitoneum. Ultrasonography showed a large mass broadly abutting the stomach and liver. Computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneous enhanced mass arising from the stomach and focal perforation of the tumor with hemoperitoneum; endoscopic ultrasonography showed an exophytic heterogeneous mass originating from the gastric muscle layer. Angiography revealed that the right gastric artery was the main artery supplying the tumor. A gastric stromal tumor with bloody fluid in the peritoneal cavity was seen at the laparotomy. The tumor was excised completely, and subsequent histological and immunohistochemical studies indicated that it was a gastric stromal tumor. We report a relatively rare case of gastric stromal tumor causing hemoperitoneum due to spontaneous rupture of the tumor. (Gut Liver 2010;4:278-282)
Keywords: Gastric stromal tumor; Hemoperitoneum; Spontaneous rupture
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