Gut and Liver 2010; 4(2): 207-211 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.2.207 Vaccination Rate and Seroepidemiology of Hepatitis A in Chronic-Hepatitis-B-Infected Individuals in the Korean Army
Author Information
Dong Hyuk Shin*, Sang Kuk Han*, Pil Cho Choi*, Seong Woo Lim, Kyung Mook Kim, and Dong Hyun Sinn
*Department of Emergency Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Department of Medicine, Armed Forces Daejeon Hospital, Daejeon, and Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam, Korea

Pil Cho Choi
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) is recommended for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), since they are potentially at an increased risk of HAV-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the adherence to these recommendations in the community. This study evaluated the current vaccination status and immunity against HAV among Korean military soldiers with CHB. Methods: We performed a prospective study of Korean military soldiers from August 2008 to January 2009. We enrolled 96 soldiers with CHB on a consecutive basis. We assessed their vaccination history and the presence of anti-HAV immunoglobulin G (IgG). Results: The HAV vaccination rate of the soldiers enrolled in our study was 2% (2 of the 96 soldiers). The seroprevalence rates of anti-HAV IgG among military soldiers without a vaccination history were 0%, 50%, and 100% for those aged 19-29 years (n=71), 30-39 years (n=8), and 40 years or older (n=15), respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions: The HAV vaccination rate is very low among military soldiers. Public health efforts aimed at raising awareness about HAV vaccination in patients with CHB should be strongly encouraged. (Gut Liver 2010;4:207-211)
Keywords: Hepatitis A; Vaccination; Military personnel; Seroepidemiologic study
Abstract
Background/Aims: Vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) is recommended for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), since they are potentially at an increased risk of HAV-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the adherence to these recommendations in the community. This study evaluated the current vaccination status and immunity against HAV among Korean military soldiers with CHB. Methods: We performed a prospective study of Korean military soldiers from August 2008 to January 2009. We enrolled 96 soldiers with CHB on a consecutive basis. We assessed their vaccination history and the presence of anti-HAV immunoglobulin G (IgG). Results: The HAV vaccination rate of the soldiers enrolled in our study was 2% (2 of the 96 soldiers). The seroprevalence rates of anti-HAV IgG among military soldiers without a vaccination history were 0%, 50%, and 100% for those aged 19-29 years (n=71), 30-39 years (n=8), and 40 years or older (n=15), respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions: The HAV vaccination rate is very low among military soldiers. Public health efforts aimed at raising awareness about HAV vaccination in patients with CHB should be strongly encouraged. (Gut Liver 2010;4:207-211)
Keywords: Hepatitis A; Vaccination; Military personnel; Seroepidemiologic study
Search for
Services
Archives