Gut and Liver https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl19202 Optimal Endoscopic Treatment and Surveillance of Serrated Polyps
Author Information
Vipin Gupta and James E. East
Translational Gastroenterology Unit and Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Experimental Medicine Division, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK

James E East
Translational Gastroenterology Unit and Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Experimental Medicine Division, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK
Tel: +44-1865-228753, Fax: +44-1865-228763, E-mail: james.east@ndm.ox.ac.uk
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Serrated polyps are considered precursor lesions that account for 15% to 30% of colorectal cancers, and they are overrepresented as a cause of interval cancers. They are difficult to detect and resect comprehensively; however, recent data suggest that high definition endoscopy, chromoendoscopy (via spray catheter, pump or orally), narrow band imaging, split-dose bowel preparation and a slower withdrawal (>6 minutes) can all improve detection. Cold snare resection is effective and safe for these lesions, including cold snare piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection, which is likely to become the standard of care for lesions >10 mm in size. Sessile serrated lesions ≥10 mm in size, those exhbiting dysplasia, or traditional serrated adenomas increase the chance of future advanced neoplasia. Thus, a consensus is emerging: a surveillance examination at 3 years should be recommended if these lesions are detected. Serrated lesions likely carry equivalent risk to adenomas, so future guidelines may consider serrated class lesions and adenomas together for risk stratification. Patients with serrated polyposis syndrome should undergo surveillance every 1 to 2 years once the colon is cleared of larger lesions, and their first degree relatives should undergo screening every 5 years starting at age 40.
Keywords: Colorectal neoplasms; Serrated polyps; Endoscopic mucosal resection; Endoscopic submucosal dissection; Serrated polyposis syndrome
Abstract
Serrated polyps are considered precursor lesions that account for 15% to 30% of colorectal cancers, and they are overrepresented as a cause of interval cancers. They are difficult to detect and resect comprehensively; however, recent data suggest that high definition endoscopy, chromoendoscopy (via spray catheter, pump or orally), narrow band imaging, split-dose bowel preparation and a slower withdrawal (>6 minutes) can all improve detection. Cold snare resection is effective and safe for these lesions, including cold snare piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection, which is likely to become the standard of care for lesions >10 mm in size. Sessile serrated lesions ≥10 mm in size, those exhbiting dysplasia, or traditional serrated adenomas increase the chance of future advanced neoplasia. Thus, a consensus is emerging: a surveillance examination at 3 years should be recommended if these lesions are detected. Serrated lesions likely carry equivalent risk to adenomas, so future guidelines may consider serrated class lesions and adenomas together for risk stratification. Patients with serrated polyposis syndrome should undergo surveillance every 1 to 2 years once the colon is cleared of larger lesions, and their first degree relatives should undergo screening every 5 years starting at age 40.
Keywords: Colorectal neoplasms; Serrated polyps; Endoscopic mucosal resection; Endoscopic submucosal dissection; Serrated polyposis syndrome
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