Gut and Liver https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl19201 Potential Strategies in the Prevention of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs-Associated Adverse Effects in the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract
Author Information
Chuan-Guo Guo and Wai K Leung
Department of Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Wai K Leung
Department of Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Tel: +852-2255-3348, Fax: +852-2816-2863, E-mail: waikleung@hku.hk
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
With the increasing use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the incidence of lower gastrointestinal (GI) complications is expected to increase. However, unlike upper GI complications, the burden, pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of NSAID-associated lower GI complications remain unclear. To date, no cost-effective and safe protective agent has been developed that can completely prevent or treat NSAID-related lower GI injuries. Selective COX-2 inhibitors, misoprostol, intestinal microbiota modulation, and some mucoprotective agents have been reported to show protective effects on NSAID-induced lower GI injuries. This review aims to provide an overview of the current evidence on the prevention of NSAID-related lower GI injuries.
Keywords: Anti-inflammatory agents, non-steroidal; Lower gastrointestinal bleeding; Protective agents
Abstract
With the increasing use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the incidence of lower gastrointestinal (GI) complications is expected to increase. However, unlike upper GI complications, the burden, pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of NSAID-associated lower GI complications remain unclear. To date, no cost-effective and safe protective agent has been developed that can completely prevent or treat NSAID-related lower GI injuries. Selective COX-2 inhibitors, misoprostol, intestinal microbiota modulation, and some mucoprotective agents have been reported to show protective effects on NSAID-induced lower GI injuries. This review aims to provide an overview of the current evidence on the prevention of NSAID-related lower GI injuries.
Keywords: Anti-inflammatory agents, non-steroidal; Lower gastrointestinal bleeding; Protective agents
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