Gut and Liver https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl19079 Preventing Metachronous Gastric Cancer after the Endoscopic Resection of Gastric Epithelial Neoplasia: Roles of Helicobacter pylori Eradication and Aspirin
Author Information
Jiro Watari , Toshihiko Tomita , Katsuyuki Tozawa , Tadayuki Oshima , Hirokazu Fukui , and Hiroto Miwa
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan

Jiro Watari
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1, Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya 663-8501, Japan
Tel: +81-798-45-6662, Fax: +81-798-45-6661, E-mail: watarij@hyo-med.ac.jp
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Whether Helicobacter pylori eradication actually reduces the risk of metachronous gastric cancer (MGC) development remains a controversial question. In this review, we addressed this topic by reviewing the results of clinical investigations and molecular pathological analyses of the roles of H. pylori eradication and aspirin administration in the prevention of MGC. In regard to the clinical studies, the results of meta-analyses and randomized control trials differ from those of retrospective studies: the former trials show that H. pylori eradication has a preventive effect on MGC, while the latter studies do not. This discrepancy may be at least partly attributable to differences in the follow-up periods: H. pylori eradication is more likely to prevent MGC over a long-term follow-up period (≥5 years) than over a short-term follow-up period. In addition, many studies have shown that aspirin may have an additive effect on MGC-risk reduction after H. pylori eradication has been achieved. Both H. pylori eradication and aspirin use induce molecular alterations in the atrophic gastritis mucosa but not in the intestinal metaplasia. Unfortunately, the molecular pathological analyses of these interventions have been limited by short follow-up periods. Therefore, a long-term prospective cohort is needed to clarify the changes in molecular events caused by these interventions.
Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; Stomach neoplasms; Eradication; Aspirin; Pathology, molecular
Abstract
Whether Helicobacter pylori eradication actually reduces the risk of metachronous gastric cancer (MGC) development remains a controversial question. In this review, we addressed this topic by reviewing the results of clinical investigations and molecular pathological analyses of the roles of H. pylori eradication and aspirin administration in the prevention of MGC. In regard to the clinical studies, the results of meta-analyses and randomized control trials differ from those of retrospective studies: the former trials show that H. pylori eradication has a preventive effect on MGC, while the latter studies do not. This discrepancy may be at least partly attributable to differences in the follow-up periods: H. pylori eradication is more likely to prevent MGC over a long-term follow-up period (≥5 years) than over a short-term follow-up period. In addition, many studies have shown that aspirin may have an additive effect on MGC-risk reduction after H. pylori eradication has been achieved. Both H. pylori eradication and aspirin use induce molecular alterations in the atrophic gastritis mucosa but not in the intestinal metaplasia. Unfortunately, the molecular pathological analyses of these interventions have been limited by short follow-up periods. Therefore, a long-term prospective cohort is needed to clarify the changes in molecular events caused by these interventions.
Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; Stomach neoplasms; Eradication; Aspirin; Pathology, molecular
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