Gut and Liver https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl19124 Increase in the Colorectal Cancer Screening Rate by a Round-Mailed Fecal Immunochemical Testing Kit and Associated Factors in Underserved Regions of Korea: A Community-Based Intervention Study
Author Information
Seri Hong1 , Hye Young Shin1 , Bomyee Lee1 , Na Rae Hwang2 , Sang-Hyun Hwang2 , and Jae Kwan Jun1,3
1National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, and 3Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea

Jae Kwan Jun
National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, 323 Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang 10408, Korea
Tel: +82-31-920-2184, Fax: +82-31-920-2929, E-mail: jkjun@ncc.re.kr
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Postal distribution of a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit has been recommended as an effective method of increasing participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The present study was performed to assess the impact of the round-mailed FIT kit on screening participation in underserved regions of Korea and to identify factors related to nonparticipation. Methods: Residents were recruited from three rural regions of Korea that lack screening units for the National Cancer Screening Program. A package containing a FIT kit for stool self-sampling and a return envelope addressed to the local health center was postally distributed to each subject. Thirty days after the kits were mailed, nonresponders were reminded via telephone as the second intervention. The participation rates and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each intervention response were calculated to evaluate the effect of the interventions and factors related to screening participation in response to the interventions. Results: CRC screening participation rates increased from 24.5% (95% CI, 21.6% to 27.4%) to 42.6% (95% CI, 39.3% to 46.0%) as a result of postal screening and increased further to 51.4% (95% CI, 48.0% to 54.9%) after the telephone reminder. After controlling for the sex, age, and household type of each subject, factors associated with poor response to postal screening were identified as low educational attainment and poor previous participation in the National Cancer Screening Program. Conclusions: Round-mailed FIT kits with phone call reminders were an effective intervention, nearly doubling the screening rate in underserved regions of Korea.
Keywords: Early detection of cancer; Colorectal neoplasms; Early medical intervention
Abstract
Background/Aims: Postal distribution of a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit has been recommended as an effective method of increasing participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The present study was performed to assess the impact of the round-mailed FIT kit on screening participation in underserved regions of Korea and to identify factors related to nonparticipation. Methods: Residents were recruited from three rural regions of Korea that lack screening units for the National Cancer Screening Program. A package containing a FIT kit for stool self-sampling and a return envelope addressed to the local health center was postally distributed to each subject. Thirty days after the kits were mailed, nonresponders were reminded via telephone as the second intervention. The participation rates and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each intervention response were calculated to evaluate the effect of the interventions and factors related to screening participation in response to the interventions. Results: CRC screening participation rates increased from 24.5% (95% CI, 21.6% to 27.4%) to 42.6% (95% CI, 39.3% to 46.0%) as a result of postal screening and increased further to 51.4% (95% CI, 48.0% to 54.9%) after the telephone reminder. After controlling for the sex, age, and household type of each subject, factors associated with poor response to postal screening were identified as low educational attainment and poor previous participation in the National Cancer Screening Program. Conclusions: Round-mailed FIT kits with phone call reminders were an effective intervention, nearly doubling the screening rate in underserved regions of Korea.
Keywords: Early detection of cancer; Colorectal neoplasms; Early medical intervention
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