Gut and Liver 2010; 4(2): 173-178 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.2.173 The Speed of Eating and Functional Dyspepsia in Young Women
Author Information
Dong Hyun Sinn*, Dong Hyuk Shin, Seong Woo Lim, Kyung-Mook Kim*, Hee Jung Son, Jae J. Kim, Jong Chul Rhee, and Poong-Lyul Rhee
*Department of Medicine, Armed Forces Daejeon Hospital, Daejeon, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Poong-Lyul Rhee
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Little information is available on whether the speed of eating differs between individuals with and without dyspepsia, mainly because controlled studies are usually not feasible. Methods: A survey was applied to 89 individuals with relatively controlled eating patterns, using questionnaires that assessed eating time and functional dyspepsia (FD) based on the Rome III criteria. Results: The prevalence of FD was 12% (11 of 89 participants), and 7% (6 of 89) were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The proportion of individuals reporting that they ate their meals rapidly was higher for those with FD than for those without FD or GERD (control) (46% vs 17%, p=0.043), as was the reported eating speed (7.1±1.5 vs 5.8±2.0 [mean±SD], p=0.045; visual analog scale on which a higher score indicated faster eating). However, the measured eating time did not differ significantly between FD and controls (11.0±2.8 vs 12.8±3.3 minutes, p=0.098). The proportion of individuals who ate their meals within 13 minutes was significantly higher for those with FD than for controls (91% vs 51%, p=0.020). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that eating speed affects dyspepsia. Further studies are warranted. (Gut Liver 2010;4:173-178)
Keywords: Diet habits; Eating speed; Functional dyspepsia
Abstract
Background/Aims: Little information is available on whether the speed of eating differs between individuals with and without dyspepsia, mainly because controlled studies are usually not feasible. Methods: A survey was applied to 89 individuals with relatively controlled eating patterns, using questionnaires that assessed eating time and functional dyspepsia (FD) based on the Rome III criteria. Results: The prevalence of FD was 12% (11 of 89 participants), and 7% (6 of 89) were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The proportion of individuals reporting that they ate their meals rapidly was higher for those with FD than for those without FD or GERD (control) (46% vs 17%, p=0.043), as was the reported eating speed (7.1±1.5 vs 5.8±2.0 [mean±SD], p=0.045; visual analog scale on which a higher score indicated faster eating). However, the measured eating time did not differ significantly between FD and controls (11.0±2.8 vs 12.8±3.3 minutes, p=0.098). The proportion of individuals who ate their meals within 13 minutes was significantly higher for those with FD than for controls (91% vs 51%, p=0.020). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that eating speed affects dyspepsia. Further studies are warranted. (Gut Liver 2010;4:173-178)
Keywords: Diet habits; Eating speed; Functional dyspepsia
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