Gut and Liver https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl18438 Mesenchymal Stem Cells Decrease Oxidative Stress in the Bowels of Interleukin-10 Knockout Mice
Author Information
Kyong Jin Jung1,2 , Gun Woo Lee3 , Chul Hyun Park3 , Tae Jin Lee1 , Joo Young Kim1 , Eon Gi Sung1 , Seong Yong Kim4 , Byung Ik Jang5 , and In Hwan Song1
1Department of Anatomy and 2Smart-Aging Convergence Research Center, Departments of 3Orthopedic Surgery, 4Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, and 5Internal Medicine, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea

In Hwan Song
Department of Anatomy, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, 170 Hyeonchung-ro, Nam-gu, Daegu 42415, Korea
Tel: +82-53-640-6912, Fax: +82-53-621-5083, E-mail: ihsong@med.yu.ac.kr
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation mainly in the large intestine. The interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10 KO) mouse is a well-known animal model of IBD that develops spontaneous intestinal inflammation resembling Crohn’s disease. Oxidative stress is considered to be the leading cause of cell and tissue damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause direct cell injury and/or indirect cell injury by inducing the secretion of cytokines from damaged cells. This study evaluated the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) on the progression of IBD. Methods: In this study, human bone marrow-derived MSCs were injected into IL-10 KO mice (MSC). Oxidative stress and inflammation levels were evaluated in the large intestine and compared with those in control IL-10 KO mice (CON) and normal wild-type control mice (Wild). Results: The levels of ROS (superoxide and hydrogen peroxidase) and a secondary end-product of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) were considerably higher in the CON, while superoxide dismutase and catalase levels were lower in the MSC. Inflammation-related marker (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-4, and CD8) expression and inflammatory histological changes were much less pronounced in MSC than in CON. Conclusions: MSCs affect the redox balance, leading to the suppression of IBD.
Keywords: Inflammatory bowel diseases; Mesenchymal stem cells; Oxidative stress; Interleukin-10 knockout KO mouse
Abstract
Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation mainly in the large intestine. The interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10 KO) mouse is a well-known animal model of IBD that develops spontaneous intestinal inflammation resembling Crohn’s disease. Oxidative stress is considered to be the leading cause of cell and tissue damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause direct cell injury and/or indirect cell injury by inducing the secretion of cytokines from damaged cells. This study evaluated the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) on the progression of IBD. Methods: In this study, human bone marrow-derived MSCs were injected into IL-10 KO mice (MSC). Oxidative stress and inflammation levels were evaluated in the large intestine and compared with those in control IL-10 KO mice (CON) and normal wild-type control mice (Wild). Results: The levels of ROS (superoxide and hydrogen peroxidase) and a secondary end-product of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) were considerably higher in the CON, while superoxide dismutase and catalase levels were lower in the MSC. Inflammation-related marker (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-4, and CD8) expression and inflammatory histological changes were much less pronounced in MSC than in CON. Conclusions: MSCs affect the redox balance, leading to the suppression of IBD.
Keywords: Inflammatory bowel diseases; Mesenchymal stem cells; Oxidative stress; Interleukin-10 knockout KO mouse
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