Gut and Liver What Are the Clinical Features and Etiology of Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration?
Author Information
Da Woon Sim1, Dong Jun Son2, Eunae Cho2, Sung Kyu Choi2, Sang Soo Shin3 and Chung Hwan Jun2
Divisions of 1Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology and 2Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, and 3Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea

Chung Hwan Jun
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Hospital, 42 Jebong-ro, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61469, Korea
Tel: +82-62-220-6296, Fax: +82-62-220-6318, E-mail: estevanj@naver.com
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Background/Aims: Although eosinophilic liver infiltration (ELI) is not rare, few data exist regarding its clinical characteristics and etiology. Therefore, we evaluated these aspects to better understand the clinical implications of this lesion type, which is reasonably common in Korea. Methods: Patients suspected of having ELI, based on abdominal computed tomography results obtained between January 2010 and September 2017, were enrolled in this retrospective study. The presumptive etiologies of ELI were categorized as parasite infections, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), malignancies, and unidentified. Clinical courses and treatment responses were also evaluated. Results: The mean age of the enrolled patients (male, 237/328) was 62 years. Most patients (63%) were diagnosed incidentally and had peripheral eosinophilia (90%). Only 38% of the enrolled patients (n=126) underwent further evaluations to elucidate the etiology of the suspected ELI; 82 (25%) had parasite infections, 31 (9%) had HES, five (2%) had EGPA, and five (2%) had drug reactions in conjunction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. Almost half of the other enrolled patients had cancer. Radiologic resolution was achieved in 191 patients (61%; median time to radiologic resolution, 185 days). Resolution of peripheral eosinophilia was achieved in 220 patients (79%). In most cases, the course of ELI was benign. Conclusions: This large ELI study is unique in that the incidence rate, underlying diseases, and clinical courses were comprehensively evaluated. Clinicians should investigate the etiology of ELI, as several of the underlying diseases require intervention rather than observation.
Keywords: Eosinophilic infiltration; Etiology; Hypereosinophilic syndrome; Liver; Parasite
Abstract
Background/Aims: Although eosinophilic liver infiltration (ELI) is not rare, few data exist regarding its clinical characteristics and etiology. Therefore, we evaluated these aspects to better understand the clinical implications of this lesion type, which is reasonably common in Korea. Methods: Patients suspected of having ELI, based on abdominal computed tomography results obtained between January 2010 and September 2017, were enrolled in this retrospective study. The presumptive etiologies of ELI were categorized as parasite infections, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), malignancies, and unidentified. Clinical courses and treatment responses were also evaluated. Results: The mean age of the enrolled patients (male, 237/328) was 62 years. Most patients (63%) were diagnosed incidentally and had peripheral eosinophilia (90%). Only 38% of the enrolled patients (n=126) underwent further evaluations to elucidate the etiology of the suspected ELI; 82 (25%) had parasite infections, 31 (9%) had HES, five (2%) had EGPA, and five (2%) had drug reactions in conjunction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. Almost half of the other enrolled patients had cancer. Radiologic resolution was achieved in 191 patients (61%; median time to radiologic resolution, 185 days). Resolution of peripheral eosinophilia was achieved in 220 patients (79%). In most cases, the course of ELI was benign. Conclusions: This large ELI study is unique in that the incidence rate, underlying diseases, and clinical courses were comprehensively evaluated. Clinicians should investigate the etiology of ELI, as several of the underlying diseases require intervention rather than observation.
Keywords: Eosinophilic infiltration; Etiology; Hypereosinophilic syndrome; Liver; Parasite
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