Gut and Liver 2010; 4(1): 122-125 https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl.2010.4.1.122 Synchronous Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma of the Colon
Author Information
Jin-Seok Park*, Lucia Kim, Chul Hyun Kim*, Byoung Wook Bang*, Don Haeng Lee*, Seok Jeong*, Yong Woon Shin*, and Hyung Gil Kim*
*Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Pathology, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea

Don Haeng Lee
© The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon is a rare entity with a prognosis that is usually poor due to the high likelihood of early metastasis. A 61-year-old man had surgery for colon cancer of the transverse colon and cecum. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed that the location was the proximal transverse colon, with small nests containing rosettes and palisading patterns of large tumor cells with faintly granular cytoplasm. The immunohistochemistry was positive for synaptophysin and chromogranins. The tumors were diagnosed as a large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon. In addition, the tumor of the cecum showed microscopic findings consistent with a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The immunohistochemical panel showed that the tumor was negative for neuroendocrine markers. There were no clinical findings suggestive of hormone hypersecretion. Cancer metastasis was found in the peritoneum section of the small bowel. Postoperative chemotherapy was applied. The patient was alive with good performance after, and there was no sign of tumor progression. This is the first case of a synchronous large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the colon. The patient was treated successfully with debulking surgery and systemic chemotherapy. (Gut Liver 2010;4:122-125)
Keywords: Neuroendocrine carcinoma; Colonic neoplasms; Multiple primary neoplasms; Chemotherapy
Abstract
Large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon is a rare entity with a prognosis that is usually poor due to the high likelihood of early metastasis. A 61-year-old man had surgery for colon cancer of the transverse colon and cecum. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed that the location was the proximal transverse colon, with small nests containing rosettes and palisading patterns of large tumor cells with faintly granular cytoplasm. The immunohistochemistry was positive for synaptophysin and chromogranins. The tumors were diagnosed as a large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon. In addition, the tumor of the cecum showed microscopic findings consistent with a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The immunohistochemical panel showed that the tumor was negative for neuroendocrine markers. There were no clinical findings suggestive of hormone hypersecretion. Cancer metastasis was found in the peritoneum section of the small bowel. Postoperative chemotherapy was applied. The patient was alive with good performance after, and there was no sign of tumor progression. This is the first case of a synchronous large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the colon. The patient was treated successfully with debulking surgery and systemic chemotherapy. (Gut Liver 2010;4:122-125)
Keywords: Neuroendocrine carcinoma; Colonic neoplasms; Multiple primary neoplasms; Chemotherapy
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